1. Winter 2014 at the Schomburg

    (Source: issuu.com)

  2. Historical Tribute: Carter G. Woodson

    Carter G. Woodson (born 1875). Convinced that the history of African-Americans was being ignored and misrepresented, took steps to put things right. In 1915 Woodson founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, now the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH). The association was created to promote and preserve African-American history and culture. He founded the Journal of Negro History in 1916.  He authored “The Miseducation of the Negro”. He died April 3,1950 #todayinblackhistory

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  3. Black History Month Exhibition! Africans in India: From Slaves to Generals and Rulers

    Generals, commanders, admirals, prime ministers, and rulers, East Africans greatly distinguished themselves in India. They wrote a story unparalleled in the rest of the world — that of enslaved Africans attaining the pinnacle of military and political authority not only in a foreign country but also on another continent. In continued celebration of Black History Month, a groundbreaking exhibition at the Schomburg Center — on view from February 1 to July 6 — retraces their extraordinary story.

    Following free traders and artisans who migrated to and traded with India, Sri Lanka and Malaysia in the fist centuries of the common era; from the 1300s onward, East Africans from Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia and adjacent areas entered the Indian subcontinent, mostly though the slave trade. Others came as soldiers and sailors. From Bengal in the northeast to Gujarat in the west and to the Deccan in Central India, they vigorously asserted themselves in the country of their enslavement. The success was theirs but it is also a strong testimony to the open-mindedness of a society in which they were a small religious and ethnic minority, originally of low status. As foreigners and Muslims, some of these Africans ruled over indigenous Hindu, Muslim and Jewish populations.

    Besides appearing in written documents, East Africans, known as Habshis (Abyssinians) and Sidis, have been immortalized in the rich paintings of different eras, states, and styles that form an important part of Indian culture.Africans in India features dramatically stunning photographic reproductions of some of these paintings, as well as photographs.

    To read more, please click here.

  4. From Birth of A Nation to Black History Month~ Christopher Moore
In the East Room of the White House on the evening of February 18, 1915,  President Woodrow Wilson gathered members of his cabinet and their families for a special screening of Birth of a Nation, D. W.  Griffith’s silent film based on the Clansman, a novel by Thomas Dixon.  After watching the film, Wilson declared it was “like writing history  with lightning. My only regret is that it’s true.”  Historians like Carter G. Woodson saw the film as a major setback in the  public’s awareness of the history and humanity of African Americans.  Astutely aware that Wilson had chosen the February season of  presidential birthdates to champion the racist film, Woodson proposed a full week, anchored by the birthdates of Abraham Lincoln (Feb. 12) and  Frederick Douglass (Feb. 14) to honor the history and contributions of  African Americans.           With the support of black leadership and major collectors of black  history, like Arturo Alfonso Schomburg, in 1926 Dr. Woodson organized  the first Negro History Week.  His goal was to educate all Americans  about African American history, focusing on culture and achievements.  Woodson was successful in his response to President Wilson’s perverse  notion of American history. In 1976, the week expanded as President  Gerald Ford declared February as Black History Month.
Check out New York Times article on DVD release of Birth of the Nation: A Leap Forward That Tugs Backward, Dave Kher.

    From Birth of A Nation to Black History Month
    ~ Christopher Moore

    In the East Room of the White House on the evening of February 18, 1915, President Woodrow Wilson gathered members of his cabinet and their families for a special screening of Birth of a Nation, D. W. Griffith’s silent film based on the Clansman, a novel by Thomas Dixon. After watching the film, Wilson declared it was “like writing history with lightning. My only regret is that it’s true.”

    Historians like Carter G. Woodson saw the film as a major setback in the public’s awareness of the history and humanity of African Americans. Astutely aware that Wilson had chosen the February season of presidential birthdates to champion the racist film, Woodson proposed a full week, anchored by the birthdates of Abraham Lincoln (Feb. 12) and Frederick Douglass (Feb. 14) to honor the history and contributions of African Americans.
            
    With the support of black leadership and major collectors of black history, like Arturo Alfonso Schomburg, in 1926 Dr. Woodson organized the first Negro History Week.  His goal was to educate all Americans about African American history, focusing on culture and achievements. Woodson was successful in his response to President Wilson’s perverse notion of American history. In 1976, the week expanded as President Gerald Ford declared February as Black History Month.

    Check out New York Times article on DVD release of Birth of the Nation: A Leap Forward That Tugs Backward, Dave Kher.