1. We’re excited to see Carolyn Malachi and THEEsatisfaction on Monday, March 31 for the final installment of our Women’s Jazz Festival 2014. In the meantime, check out Carolyn Malachi's music video for “All Right”

    Be sure to get your tickets for Women’s Jazz Festival, before they sell out! 

  2. Watch last night’s engaging and powerful conversation at the Schomburg Center: Between the Lines: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and Zadie Smith.

  3. The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture has been chosen as a 2014 finalist for a National Medal for Museum and Library Service by the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services.  Now in its 20th year, this award is the nation’s highest honor for extraordinary public service, recognizing institutions that are valuable community anchors. As a member of our community, we ask you to please share your own stories about the Schomburg Center here: www.facebook.com/USIMLS. 

    The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture has been chosen as a 2014 finalist for a National Medal for Museum and Library Service by the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services.  Now in its 20th year, this award is the nation’s highest honor for extraordinary public service, recognizing institutions that are valuable community anchors. As a member of our community, we ask you to please share your own stories about the Schomburg Center here: www.facebook.com/USIMLS

    (Source: )

  4. Women’s Jazz Festival 2014 
Mondays, March 10, 17, 24 & 31 at 7 p.m.  


March is Women’s History Month and at the Schomburg we mark this occasion with our Women’s Jazz Festival. Now in its 21st year, Women’s Jazz is our signature performance series. Singer, composer, producer, and activist Toshi Reagon returns to curate three of the four concerts. This year’s lineup includes:The Blues ProjectSpelman Jazz EnsembleMeshell Ndegeocello and Mem NahadrCarolyn Malachi and THESatisfaction
Get Your Tickets NOW

    Women’s Jazz Festival 2014 

    Mondays, March 10, 17, 24 & 31 at 7 p.m.
      

    March is Women’s History Month and at the Schomburg we mark this occasion with our Women’s Jazz Festival. Now in its 21st year, Women’s Jazz is our signature performance series. Singer, composer, producer, and activist Toshi Reagon returns to curate three of the four concerts. This year’s lineup includes:

    The Blues Project
    Spelman Jazz Ensemble
    Meshell Ndegeocello and Mem Nahadr
    Carolyn Malachi and THESatisfaction

    Get Your Tickets NOW

  5. The Studio Museum in Harlem and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture are pleased to announce a major collaboration celebrating the 100th anniversary of the birth of one of America’s greatest writers, Ralph Ellison. On Saturday, March 1, 2014—a century after Ellison’s birth in Oklahoma City—Ellison at 100: Reading Invisible Man will kick off a year of programs and initiatives celebrating the Ellison Centennial.

    Ellison at 100: Reading Invisible Man is free and open to all, and is organized by the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture and The Studio Museum in Harlem with the generous support of the Ralph and Fanny Ellison Charitable Trust. 

  6. New Date!
Join us on March 13 at 6:30 p.m. for a conversation between award-winning historian Sylviane A. Diouf and Pulitzer Prize winner Eric Foner about Diouf’s new book, Slavery’s Exiles: The Story of the American Maroons. 
In a preview of the talk, Diouf said: “One of my most surprising discoveries was the existence of maroons who have been completely overlooked. I call them “borderland maroons” because they settled in the woods and swamps bordering plantations. What is astonishing is that individuals, mothers with children, and entire families lived there for years in underground homes. Something else amazed me: the extent of the enslaved community’s solidarity without which the maroons could not have survived. The maroon experience was truly extraordinary and sheds new light on the larger slave resistance.”Free! Registration required.Photo Credit: Fugitive Slaves in the Dismal Swamp, Virginia by David Edward CroninNew-York Historical Society

    New Date!

    Join us on March 13 at 6:30 p.m. for a conversation between award-winning historian Sylviane A. Diouf and Pulitzer Prize winner Eric Foner about Diouf’s new book, Slavery’s Exiles: The Story of the American Maroons


    In a preview of the talk, Diouf said: “One of my most surprising discoveries was the existence of maroons who have been completely overlooked. I call them “borderland maroons” because they settled in the woods and swamps bordering plantations. What is astonishing is that individuals, mothers with children, and entire families lived there for years in underground homes. Something else amazed me: the extent of the enslaved community’s solidarity without which the maroons could not have survived. The maroon experience was truly extraordinary and sheds new light on the larger slave resistance.”

    Free! Registration required.

    Photo Credit: 
    Fugitive Slaves in the Dismal Swamp, Virginia by David Edward Cronin
    New-York Historical Society

  7. Join the Smithsonian Latino Center and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture for a public program honoring the legacy of the Puerto Rican-born, New York-based bibliophile and intellectual Arturo Schomburg (1874-1938).  This program will feature presentations by Fredericka Liggins (Hunter College), Adalaine Holton (Richard Stockton College of New Jersey), and Frances Negrón-Muntaner (Columbia University), followed by an onstage discussion and Q&A moderated by Khalil Muhammad, Director of the Schomburg Center.  Theater doors will open at 6 p.m.  
Free! First come, first seated.
This program will be webcast live!  View it here:
For more information call (202) 633-0925 or email woodamanr@si.edu.  

    Join the Smithsonian Latino Center and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture for a public program honoring the legacy of the Puerto Rican-born, New York-based bibliophile and intellectual Arturo Schomburg (1874-1938).  This program will feature presentations by Fredericka Liggins (Hunter College), Adalaine Holton (Richard Stockton College of New Jersey), and Frances Negrón-Muntaner (Columbia University), followed by an onstage discussion and Q&A moderated by Khalil Muhammad, Director of the Schomburg Center.  Theater doors will open at 6 p.m.  

    Free! First come, first seated.

    This program will be webcast live!  View it here:

    For more information call (202) 633-0925 or email woodamanr@si.edu.  

  8. Civil rights activist Rosa Parks is quoted as saying that she’d “like to be remembered as a person who wanted to be free and wanted other people to be also free.” Today we remember the legacy of Ms. Parks who was born on this day, February 4, 1913.

    Civil rights activist Rosa Parks is quoted as saying that she’d “like to be remembered as a person who wanted to be free and wanted other people to be also free.” Today we remember the legacy of Ms. Parks who was born on this day, February 4, 1913.

  9. Films at the Schomburg: Jamel Shabazz Street Photographer

    Monday, February 10, 2014 from 6:30pm to 8:00pm

    Jamel Shabazz has documentedurban life for more than 30 years and has covered the cultural growth of hip-hop in New York City since the 1980s. This film is a portrait of his life, career, and impact as a photographer, educator, and visual artist. Join director Charlie Ahearn (Wild Style) for a talkback with Shabazz.

    For more information and to register, visit our event’s page.  

  10. Don’t miss the Slavery on Film symposium at Museum of the Moving Image: Massa’ Gaze: Screenings and Critical Discussions of the Depictions of Slavery in Film and Television on February 1, from 11 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.The symposium features screenings, panels, special guests: Sheril Antonio, Neema Barnette, Jelani Cobb, Stanley Crouch, Warrington Hudlin, Malcolm Lee, Shola Lynch, and Khalil Muhammad.  Tickets here!

    Don’t miss the Slavery on Film symposium at Museum of the Moving Image: Massa’ Gaze: Screenings and Critical Discussions of the Depictions of Slavery in Film and Television on February 1, from 11 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.

    The symposium features screenings, panels, special guests: Sheril Antonio, Neema Barnette, Jelani Cobb, Stanley Crouch, Warrington Hudlin, Malcolm Lee, Shola Lynch, and Khalil Muhammad.  

    Tickets here!

  11. Friday, January 31, 2014 from 6:30pm to 8:00pm
The Schomburg Center is proud to present “In the Tradition: An Intergenerational Dialogue on Progressive Activism and Black America,” a dialogue between actor, author, and activist Harry Belafonte and Dr. Melissa Harris-Perry, Professor of Political Science at Tulane University, MSNBC Host and author of Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women in America on the tradition of black activism, the role of activist intellectuals, the critical lessons of past movements and the challenges of organizing in the twenty-first century. How has the landscape for social justice become more complicated? What are the responsibilities of the black community to its advocates in times of attack? Join us for an enlightening conversation to be moderated by Dr. Jelani Cobb. 

For more information and to register, visit our event’s page.

    Friday, January 31, 2014 from 6:30pm to 8:00pm

    The Schomburg Center is proud to present “In the Tradition: An Intergenerational Dialogue on Progressive Activism and Black America,” a dialogue between actor, author, and activist Harry Belafonte and Dr. Melissa Harris-Perry, Professor of Political Science at Tulane University, MSNBC Host and author of Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women in America on the tradition of black activism, the role of activist intellectuals, the critical lessons of past movements and the challenges of organizing in the twenty-first century. How has the landscape for social justice become more complicated? What are the responsibilities of the black community to its advocates in times of attack? 

    Join us for an enlightening conversation to be moderated by Dr. Jelani Cobb.
     

    For more information and to register, visit our event’s page.

  12. Between the Lines: Rebecca Walker

    Monday, January 27, 2014 6:30 – 8:00 pm

    Join us for the first installment of our author conversation series. Known for her memoirs, Rebecca Walker returns with a poetic debut novel, Adé, a transcendent love story turned tale of survival. Join Walker and award-winning author Veronica Chambers for a conversation about Adé, followed by a book signing.

    For more information and to register, visit our event’s page.

  13. Phillis Wheatley, the first African-American to be a published poet, was emancipated today (January 21) in 1745.

    What does Phillis Wheatley’s and St. Augustine’s work have in common? Thomas Mellins, curator of The New York Public Library’s “Celebrating 100 Years” exhibition, explains in this video.

  14. Join the Schomburg Center on Thursday, January 23 from 6:30 - 8:00 pm for our first Arturo Schomburg Annual Lecture with Frances Negrón-Muntaner, associate professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University.Our inaugural speaker is an award-winning filmmaker, advocate, and scholar, and is also the Director of Columbia’s Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race.
For more information and to register visit our event’s page.

    Join the Schomburg Center on Thursday, January 23 from 6:30 - 8:00 pm for our first Arturo Schomburg Annual Lecture with Frances Negrón-Muntaner, associate professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University.Our inaugural speaker is an award-winning filmmaker, advocate, and scholar, and is also the Director of Columbia’s Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race.

    For more information and to register visit our event’s page.

  15. Today (January 7) is the 123rd birthday of Zora Neale Hurston, anthropologist, folklorist and novelist.
 

 

    Today (January 7) is the 123rd birthday of Zora Neale Hurston, anthropologist, folklorist and novelist.