1. Africans in India: Then and Now →

    Check out this article by Sylviane A. Diouf, Curator of Digital Collections at the Schomburg!

  2. Mae C. Jemison, the first African American female in space, was born on this date, October 17, 1956 in Decatur, Alabama. She became the first African-American woman to be in the astronaut training program in 1987. On mission STS47, she flew into space with six other astronauts on the Endeavour. She was in space for eight days conducting experiments on weightlessness and motion sickness. Jemison has won many awards and doctorates. Some of the awards include the NASA Space Flight Medal, Essence Science and Technology Award, and the Ebony Black Achievement Award. She was also inducted in the International Space Hall of Fame. 

    Mae C. Jemison, the first African American female in space, was born on this date, October 17, 1956 in Decatur, Alabama. She became the first African-American woman to be in the astronaut training program in 1987. On mission STS47, she flew into space with six other astronauts on the Endeavour. She was in space for eight days conducting experiments on weightlessness and motion sickness. Jemison has won many awards and doctorates. Some of the awards include the NASA Space Flight Medal, Essence Science and Technology Award, and the Ebony Black Achievement Award. She was also inducted in the International Space Hall of Fame. 

  3. Between the Lines: Charles Blow by Schomburg Center →

    Join us for Between the Lines: Charles M. Blow on LiveStream now!

    Use #TeamFire to join the conversation!

    New York Times columnist Charles M. Blow will be in conversation with Director of the Schomburg Center Khalil Gibran Muhammad about his new book, Fire Shut Up in My Bones. The gorgeous, moving memoir takes a look at how America’s most innovative and respected journalists found his voice by coming to terms with a painful past. 

    You can also join Charles Blow and Khalil Muhammad for an intimate dinner at Red Rooster at 9pm. Limited seats and reservations. To purchase your seat visit: http://bit.ly/1uHApvz

  4. Films at the Schomburg: Muslim Voices of Philadelphia and New York
Monday, October 27, 6:30 - 8:00pm Join us for screenings of a series of short documentaries produced by the Muslim Voices community history project. The goal of the Muslim Voices Project is to provide instruction and media tools to traditionally underrepresented Muslim groups so that they can research and share the stories, significant events, achievements and issues that are part of both the history of Islam in Philadelphia and New York.
For more information and to register, click here.

    Films at the Schomburg: Muslim Voices of Philadelphia and New York

    Monday, October 27, 6:30 - 8:00pm Join us for screenings of a series of short documentaries produced by the Muslim Voices community history project. The goal of the Muslim Voices Project is to provide instruction and media tools to traditionally underrepresented Muslim groups so that they can research and share the stories, significant events, achievements and issues that are part of both the history of Islam in Philadelphia and New York.

    For more information and to register, click here.

  5. Known by many as “Wilt the Stilt,” Wilton Norman Chamberlain was born August 21, 1936 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Chamberlain, pictured, started playing with the Harlem Globetrotters before he was on the team for the Philadelphia Warriors. He was the first NBA player to score more than 30,000 points in his career. While playing for the Philadelphia Warriors against the New York Knicks in 1962, he became the only NBA player to ever score 100 points in a single game. Chamberlain managed to score an average of about 30 points per game throughout his career. He was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in the year 1978. Chamberlain passed away due to heart failure on this date, October 12, 1999. But today we remember him as one of the greatest basketball players of all time.

    Known by many as “Wilt the Stilt,” Wilton Norman Chamberlain was born August 21, 1936 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Chamberlain, pictured, started playing with the Harlem Globetrotters before he was on the team for the Philadelphia Warriors. He was the first NBA player to score more than 30,000 points in his career. While playing for the Philadelphia Warriors against the New York Knicks in 1962, he became the only NBA player to ever score 100 points in a single game. Chamberlain managed to score an average of about 30 points per game throughout his career. He was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in the year 1978. Chamberlain passed away due to heart failure on this date, October 12, 1999. But today we remember him as one of the greatest basketball players of all time.

  6. Jazz drummer and band leader Art Blakey was born on this date, October 11, 1919. 

    In celebration, watch Art Blakey & the Messengers in their performance of “It’s You or No One” from 1958. 

  7. Afro-Latin@s Now: Race Counts!
The AfroLatin@ Forum is pleased to present Afro-Latin@s Now: Race Counts!, a three-day international conference to be held October 23–25, 2014, in New York City. This gathering will provide a unique opportunity to examine the structural and ideological barriers to full Afro-Latino representation and discuss opportunities for positive social change. For more information on the Forum and the conference: www.afrolatinoforum.org.
The afrolatin@ forum raises awareness of Latin@s of African descent in the United States. The organization is committed to advancing the visibility of Black Latin@s through dialogue and action and promoting an understanding of the afrolatin@ experience. The emphasis is guided by a transnational perspective that recognizes the centrality of race in today’s global reality and the struggle for social justice.
For more information and to register, click here.

    Afro-Latin@s Now: Race Counts!

    The AfroLatin@ Forum is pleased to present Afro-Latin@s Now: Race Counts!, a three-day international conference to be held October 23–25, 2014, in New York City. This gathering will provide a unique opportunity to examine the structural and ideological barriers to full Afro-Latino representation and discuss opportunities for positive social change. For more information on the Forum and the conference: www.afrolatinoforum.org.

    The afrolatin@ forum raises awareness of Latin@s of African descent in the United States. The organization is committed to advancing the visibility of Black Latin@s through dialogue and action and promoting an understanding of the afrolatin@ experience. The emphasis is guided by a transnational perspective that recognizes the centrality of race in today’s global reality and the struggle for social justice.

    For more information and to register, click here.

  8. Talks at the Schomburg: Ntozake Shange
Wednesday, October 15, 2014, 6:30 - 8:00pm 
In conjunction with the exhibition i found god in myself, Shange celebrates the 40th anniversary of her landmark work, for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf, with a discussion about its creation and influence.
When Ntozake Shange’s for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf: a choreopoem appeared on the theater scene in New York City in 1975, it achieved immense popularity. Ten years later, it was still being produced in various theaters throughout the United States. With this “choreo poem”—a performance piece made up of a combination of poems and dance—Shange introduced various themes and concerns that continue to characterize her writings and performances. Her works are often angry diatribes against social forces that contribute to the oppression of black women in the United States combined with a celebration of women’s self-fulfillment and spiritual survival.
For more information click here.
Watch Live!

    Talks at the Schomburg: Ntozake Shange

    Wednesday, October 15, 2014, 6:30 - 8:00pm

    In conjunction with the exhibition i found god in myself, Shange celebrates the 40th anniversary of her landmark work, for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf, with a discussion about its creation and influence.


    When Ntozake Shange’s for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf: a choreopoem appeared on the theater scene in New York City in 1975, it achieved immense popularity. Ten years later, it was still being produced in various theaters throughout the United States. With this “choreo poem”—a performance piece made up of a combination of poems and dance—Shange introduced various themes and concerns that continue to characterize her writings and performances. Her works are often angry diatribes against social forces that contribute to the oppression of black women in the United States combined with a celebration of women’s self-fulfillment and spiritual survival.

    For more information click here.

    Watch Live!

  9. Between the Lines: Charles M. Blow
Tuesday, October 14 at 6:30 PM
New York Times columnist Charles M. Blow in conversation with Director of the Schomburg Center Khalil Gibran Muhammad about his new book, Fire Shut Up in My Bones. The gorgeous, moving memoir takes a look at how America’s most innovative and respected journalists found his voice by coming to terms with a painful past. 

After the talk, head over to Ginny’s Supper Club at 9:00 PM and join us for an intimate dinner conversation with Charles M. Blow and Khalil Gibran Muhammad as they discuss Blow’s new memoir. For more information about this intimate 3 course dinner, click here. 
Click Here to Register!
Watch Live!

    Between the Lines: Charles M. Blow

    Tuesday, October 14 at 6:30 PM

    New York Times columnist Charles M. Blow in conversation with Director of the Schomburg Center Khalil Gibran Muhammad about his new book, Fire Shut Up in My Bones. The gorgeous, moving memoir takes a look at how America’s most innovative and respected journalists found his voice by coming to terms with a painful past. 

    After the talk, head over to Ginny’s Supper Club at 9:00 PM and join us for an intimate dinner conversation with Charles M. Blow and Khalil Gibran Muhammad as they discuss Blow’s new memoir. For more information about this intimate 3 course dinner, click here

    Click Here to Register!

    Watch Live!

  10. Fannie Lou Hamer, voting rights activist and civil rights leader, was born on this date October 6, 1917. Hamer began her work as a civil rights activist after attending a protest meeting where she met civil rights activists who encouraged African Americans to register to vote. She became one of the few African Americans who made the decision to register and traveled with others to do so. Hamer worked for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, fighting racial segregation and injustices in the South. Although she faced many consequences, being beaten, threatened and arrested among them, Hamer’s spirit remained unbroken. She helped found the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party in 1964 and made history with her speech at a nationwide televised convention. 

    Listen to her speech to the DNC in 1964 here

  11. Conversations on Self Determination: God and Medicine
Saturday, October 11 at 3:30PM
Weeksville Heritage Center [158 Buffalo Avenue, Brooklyn, NY]
Creative Time and Weeksville Heritage Center in collaboration with the Schomburg Center presents Conversations on Self Determination, a series to compliment Funk, God, Jazz, and Medicine: Black Radical Brooklyn.
Investigate the contested past of Black bodies and Black souls. Speakers tackle the health effects of discrimination while linking wellness to African-American spiritual traditions.

For more information and to register, click here.

    Conversations on Self Determination: God and Medicine

    Saturday, October 11 at 3:30PM

    Weeksville Heritage Center [158 Buffalo Avenue, Brooklyn, NY]

    Creative Time and Weeksville Heritage Center in collaboration with the Schomburg Center presents Conversations on Self Determination, a series to compliment Funk, God, Jazz, and Medicine: Black Radical Brooklyn.

    Investigate the contested past of Black bodies and Black souls. Speakers tackle the health effects of discrimination while linking wellness to African-American spiritual traditions.

    For more information and to register, click here.

  12. "We prefer poverty in liberty than riches in slavery."
- Ahmed Sekou Toure
On October 2, 1958, the Republic of Guinea, under Ahmed Sekou Toure, gained independence from France. Toure, pictured, became the Republic of Guinea’s first president. 
Read more about the Guinea independence here.
Image Source: Photographs and Prints Division, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, The New York Public Library

    "We prefer poverty in liberty than riches in slavery."

    - Ahmed Sekou Toure

    On October 2, 1958, the Republic of Guinea, under Ahmed Sekou Toure, gained independence from France. Toure, pictured, became the Republic of Guinea’s first president. 

    Read more about the Guinea independence here.

    Image Source: Photographs and Prints Division, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, The New York Public Library

  13. Conversations on Self Determination: Funk and Jazz
Saturday, October 4, 3:30PM
Weeksville Heritage Center [158 Buffalo Avenue, Brooklyn, NY]
Creative Time and Weeksville Heritage Center in collaboration with the Schomburg Center presents Conversations on Self Determination, a series to compliment Funk, God, Jazz, and Medicine: Black Radical Brooklyn.
Explore music as a soundtrack for social justice. Leading contemporary Brooklyn artists reflect on their art while revisiting the anthems that fortified and consoled the African-American-led struggle for desegregation and equal rights.

For more information and to register, click here.

    Conversations on Self Determination: Funk and Jazz

    Saturday, October 4, 3:30PM

    Weeksville Heritage Center [158 Buffalo Avenue, Brooklyn, NY]

    Creative Time and Weeksville Heritage Center in collaboration with the Schomburg Center presents Conversations on Self Determination, a series to compliment Funk, God, Jazz, and Medicine: Black Radical Brooklyn.

    Explore music as a soundtrack for social justice. Leading contemporary Brooklyn artists reflect on their art while revisiting the anthems that fortified and consoled the African-American-led struggle for desegregation and equal rights.

    For more information and to register, click here.

  14. Films at the Schomburg: Miners Shot Down
Saturday, October 11, 4:00 - 5:30pm 
Join us for a screening of Rehad Desai’s Miners Shot Down in the second installment of The Liberation Series. The film focuses on the events of August 2012, when the Marikana mine in South Africa experienced the worst episode of bloodshed since the end of apartheid. For seven days, thousands of miners protested for a living wage. The non-violent demonstration was brought down through an intervention by state police forces, in which more than 30 miners were shot dead and many others injured. In this political thriller, the director reconstructs the sequence of events through testimonies and footage of the massacre, drawing a disturbing picture of the mechanism of power in South Africa, where corporations make profits by exploiting the poorest. 
For More Information and to Register, Click Here.

    Films at the Schomburg: Miners Shot Down

    Saturday, October 11, 4:00 - 5:30pm

    Join us for a screening of Rehad Desai’s Miners Shot Down in the second installment of The Liberation Series. The film focuses on the events of August 2012, when the Marikana mine in South Africa experienced the worst episode of bloodshed since the end of apartheid. For seven days, thousands of miners protested for a living wage. The non-violent demonstration was brought down through an intervention by state police forces, in which more than 30 miners were shot dead and many others injured. In this political thriller, the director reconstructs the sequence of events through testimonies and footage of the massacre, drawing a disturbing picture of the mechanism of power in South Africa, where corporations make profits by exploiting the poorest.

    For More Information and to Register, Click Here.

  15. Conversations in Black Freedom Studies - Education for Liberation and Freedom Schooling with Charles Payne, Brian Purnell, Ujju Aggarwal, and Nicle Burrowes.
October 2, 2014, at 6 p.m.
Schomburg Education presents this dynamic adult education series with a full line up of provocative scholars and community members committed to engaging dialogue about black freedom studies.  The Fall 2014 semester is curated by professors Jeanne Theoharis (Brooklyn College/CUNY) and Komozi Woodard (Sarah Lawrence College).
For more information and to register click here.

    Conversations in Black Freedom Studies - Education for Liberation and Freedom Schooling with Charles Payne, Brian Purnell, Ujju Aggarwal, and Nicle Burrowes.

    October 2, 2014, at 6 p.m.

    Schomburg Education presents this dynamic adult education series with a full line up of provocative scholars and community members committed to engaging dialogue about black freedom studies.  The Fall 2014 semester is curated by professors Jeanne Theoharis (Brooklyn College/CUNY) and Komozi Woodard (Sarah Lawrence College).

    For more information and to register click here.