1. The Schomburg’s Dr. Khalil G. Muhammad will be in conversation with Sandra King on an upcoming episode of Due Process, a production of Rutgers School of Law-Newark and Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy. 

Tune in Sunday July 27 at 9:30am and 7pm & Tuesday July 29 at 11:30pm as Dr. Muhammad discusses “his book, his life, his ancestry, [and] his bold ideas.”
Due Process can be viewed on NJTV (New Jersey Public Television) as well as online via:
Due Process’ Youtube Channel
Due Process’ Website

    The Schomburg’s Dr. Khalil G. Muhammad will be in conversation with Sandra King on an upcoming episode of Due Process, a production of Rutgers School of Law-Newark and Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy.

    Tune in Sunday July 27 at 9:30am and 7pm & Tuesday July 29 at 11:30pm as Dr. Muhammad discusses “his book, his life, his ancestry, [and] his bold ideas.”

    Due Process can be viewed on NJTV (New Jersey Public Television) as well as online via:

    Due Process’ Youtube Channel

    Due Process’ Website

  2. Ira Aldridge was born July 24, 1807, in New York City. Aldridge’s first exposure to live theatre was from the balcony of the Park Theatre, where the city’s performance arts was thriving. Then, with a booming interest, having acted with the African Grove Theatre, and still a teenager, Aldridge moved to London and toured many provinces in Europe. In 1826, Aldridge played Othello at London’s Royalty Theatre and made his London debut. Aldridge, despite having faced racism and prejudice from fellow actors and critics alike, became the first prominent black american actor to establish mainstream success in Shakespearean roles and to grace the stage of a major London theatre.

Image: NYPL Digital Gallery

    Ira Aldridge was born July 24, 1807, in New York City. Aldridge’s first exposure to live theatre was from the balcony of the Park Theatre, where the city’s performance arts was thriving. Then, with a booming interest, having acted with the African Grove Theatre, and still a teenager, Aldridge moved to London and toured many provinces in Europe. In 1826, Aldridge played Othello at London’s Royalty Theatre and made his London debut. Aldridge, despite having faced racism and prejudice from fellow actors and critics alike, became the first prominent black american actor to establish mainstream success in Shakespearean roles and to grace the stage of a major London theatre.

    Image: NYPL Digital Gallery

  3. Nelson Mandela was born on this day, July 18, 1918. As we remember his life and legacy, we also celebrate Nelson Mandela International Day. On November 2009, the United Nations General Assembly designated July 18 as a day of commemoration of the former South African President’s contribution to the culture of peace and freedom. To learn more about Mandela Day, click here. 

    Nelson Mandela was born on this day, July 18, 1918. As we remember his life and legacy, we also celebrate Nelson Mandela International Day. On November 2009, the United Nations General Assembly designated July 18 as a day of commemoration of the former South African President’s contribution to the culture of peace and freedom. 

    To learn more about Mandela Day, click here

  4. Schomburg on Location*
Writing Blackness: Harlem | Paris
On view through August 10, 2014
 
Writing Blackness: Harlem | Paris is an exploration of the Harlem Renaissance through the Schomburg Center collection. The exhibit was inspired by the function of the literary salons as a convening physical space where dialogue and exchange of ideas was fostered among intellectuals and cultural producers. Writing Blackness aims to incite intellectual engagement by making archival materials accessible and ‘activating’ the Schomburg Collection in a living space—literally, a 2 bedroom apartment in an affordable housing, educational and cultural arts mixed-use development. This exhibition is presented as part of No Longer Empty’s site specific art exhibit, If You Build It. 
 
For more information, click here. 
Follow Writing Blackness on Tumblr: writingblackness
 
*Location: 155th Street & St. Nicholas Avenue, New York 10032

    Schomburg on Location*
    Writing Blackness: Harlem | Paris
    On view through August 10, 2014
     
    Writing Blackness: Harlem | Paris is an exploration of the Harlem Renaissance through the Schomburg Center collection. The exhibit was inspired by the function of the literary salons as a convening physical space where dialogue and exchange of ideas was fostered among intellectuals and cultural producers. Writing Blackness aims to incite intellectual engagement by making archival materials accessible and ‘activating’ the Schomburg Collection in a living space—literally, a 2 bedroom apartment in an affordable housing, educational and cultural arts mixed-use development. This exhibition is presented as part of No Longer Empty’s site specific art exhibit, If You Build It. 
     
    For more information, click here
    Follow Writing Blackness on Tumblr: writingblackness
     
    *Location: 155th Street & St. Nicholas Avenue, New York 10032

  5. 2014 Harlem Book Fair →

  6. harlembookfair2014 →

    Saturday, July 12, 2014. 11am-6pm

    Stop by the 16th Annual Harlem Book Fair and the 1st Annual HBF Urban Arts & Lit Book Festival.

    Panel discussions will be held in the Schomburg’s Langston Hughes Auditorium and broadcasted live on C-SPAN2.

  7. Friday, August 1 at 6:00 p.m.
First Fridays
This month’s First Fridays at the Schomburg is themed “For the Love of House Music,” in honor of Frankie Knuckles. Known as the “Godfather,” Knuckles helped build House, a style of Chicago dance music that revolutionized club culture in the ‘70s and ‘80s and still resonates around the world today. Check out our wonderful displays, sign-up for a membership, and visit our Schomburg Gift Shop while networking and dancing the night away.
Our DJs for the night will be DJ Masai and DJ Frankie Paradise. 

For More Information and to Register, Click Here

    Friday, August 1 at 6:00 p.m.

    First Fridays

    This month’s First Fridays at the Schomburg is themed “For the Love of House Music,” in honor of Frankie Knuckles. Known as the “Godfather,” Knuckles helped build House, a style of Chicago dance music that revolutionized club culture in the ‘70s and ‘80s and still resonates around the world today. Check out our wonderful displays, sign-up for a membership, and visit our Schomburg Gift Shop while networking and dancing the night away.

    Our DJs for the night will be DJ Masai and DJ Frankie Paradise. 

    For More Information and to Register, Click Here

  8. 





As you celebrate Independence Day, check out this photo from our Photographs and Prints Division of a 4th of July celebration in St. Helena Island, South Carolina (year unknown).

Image ID: 1260135 

    As you celebrate Independence Day, check out this photo from our Photographs and Prints Division of a 4th of July celebration in St. Helena Island, South Carolina (year unknown).

    Image ID: 1260135 

  9. 50 years ago on July 2, 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act into law, outlawing discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, and religion. This legendary bill was enacted 10 years after the Supreme Court Ruled, in the historic Brown v. Board of Education case, that the racial segregation of children in public schools violated the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.
Explore the Civil Rights Act and other moments surrounding the legendary Brown v. Board case with our pop-up exhibit “On the Road to Integration: Celebrating the 60th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education” (on display until July 26, 2014).
To learn more about this exhibit and others, click here.

    50 years ago on July 2, 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act into law, outlawing discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, and religion. This legendary bill was enacted 10 years after the Supreme Court Ruled, in the historic Brown v. Board of Education case, that the racial segregation of children in public schools violated the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.

    Explore the Civil Rights Act and other moments surrounding the legendary Brown v. Board case with our pop-up exhibit “On the Road to Integration: Celebrating the 60th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education” (on display until July 26, 2014).

    To learn more about this exhibit and others, click here.

  10. Purple Rain! Talk at the Schomburg →

    Did you miss Purple Rain! yesterday? Watch now via Livestream.

  11. Monday, June 30, 2014. 6:30-8:00 PM  
Harlem LGBT Community: A Conversation
As a closing for Gay Pride Month, we invite you to the Schomburg Center for a community conversation. This program is presented by In The Life Archive. 
For more information and to register, click here

    Monday, June 30, 2014. 6:30-8:00 PM  

    Harlem LGBT Community: A Conversation

    As a closing for Gay Pride Month, we invite you to the Schomburg Center for a community conversation. This program is presented by In The Life Archive. 

    For more information and to register, click here

  12. Today is Juneteenth, which commemorates the ending of slavery in Texas on June 19, 1865. Although the Emancipation Proclamation was issued by Abraham Lincoln on January 1, 1863, it was not enforced in the state of Texas due to a lack of Union troop presence and enforcement in the confederate state. 

    However on June 19, 1865, Union soldiers led by Major General Gordon Granger and his regiment  entered Galveston, Texas to override the resistance to the law and to enforce the Executive Orders. Union Major-General Gordon Granger read General Orders, No.3 to the people of Galveston. It stated:

    "The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them becomes that between employer and hired labor. The freedmen are advised to remain quietly at their present homes and work for wages. They are informed that they will not be allowed to collect at military posts and that they will not be supported in idleness either there or elsewhere."

    Since 1865 black Americans have regarded June 19th as the official emancipation day, and on January 1, 1980, the state of Texas proclaimed June 19 an official state holiday thanks to the African American state legislator Al Edwards.

  13. PURPLE RAIN!Wednesday, June 25, 2014. 6:30-8:00 pm.Celebrate the 30th anniversary of Prince’s “Purple Rain” LP with a conversation featuring Greg Tate, Karen Good Marable and Zaheer Ali and moderated by Ebony.com’s Miles Marshall Lewis. Stay for the garden party with Burnt Sugar Arkestra “sugarizing” the LP immediately following the panel discussion.For more information and to register, click here.  

    PURPLE RAIN!
    Wednesday, June 25, 2014. 6:30-8:00 pm.

    Celebrate the 30th anniversary of Prince’s “Purple Rain” LP with a conversation featuring Greg Tate, Karen Good Marable and Zaheer Ali and moderated by Ebony.com’s Miles Marshall Lewis. Stay for the garden party with Burnt Sugar Arkestra “sugarizing” the LP immediately following the panel discussion.

    For more information and to register, click here.  

  14. "As an actress, Ms. Dee was a bridge between the Harlem Renaissance and contemporary black theater. Inspired by Paul Robeson whom she met at the Schomburg’s American Negro Theater, she helped make artistry as a form of activism real and meaningful for actors as influential as Harry Belafonte and Audra McDonald." —Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad, The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture
Image: Ruby Dee and Sydney Poitier in Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin in the Sun, 1959. NYPL Digital Gallery, Image ID 5013050.

    "As an actress, Ms. Dee was a bridge between the Harlem Renaissance and contemporary black theater. Inspired by Paul Robeson whom she met at the Schomburg’s American Negro Theater, she helped make artistry as a form of activism real and meaningful for actors as influential as Harry Belafonte and Audra McDonald." —Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad, The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

    Image: Ruby Dee and Sydney Poitier in Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin in the Sun, 1959. NYPL Digital Gallery, Image ID 5013050.

  15. We take pause to remember the legacy of actress, activist, and dear friend of the Schomburg, Ruby Dee, who passed away on June 11, 2014.
Photo Credit: Photographs and Prints Division, Schomburg Center

    We take pause to remember the legacy of actress, activist, and dear friend of the Schomburg, Ruby Dee, who passed away on June 11, 2014.

    Photo Credit: Photographs and Prints Division, Schomburg Center