1. January 1st.
7th (last) day of Kwanzaa: Imani (Faith). To believe in our people, our parents, our teachers, our leaders and the righteousness and victory of our struggle.

    January 1st.

    7th (last) day of Kwanzaa: Imani (Faith). To believe in our people, our parents, our teachers, our leaders and the righteousness and victory of our struggle.

  2. December 31st.
6th day of Kwanzaa: Kuumba (Creativity). To do all we can, in any way, to leave our community more beautiful and beneficial than when we inherited it.

    December 31st.

    6th day of Kwanzaa: Kuumba (Creativity). To do all we can, in any way, to leave our community more beautiful and beneficial than when we inherited it.

  3. December 30th.
5th day of Kwanzaa: Nia (Purpose). To make our collective vocation the development of our community; to restore our people to their classic greatness.

    December 30th.

    5th day of Kwanzaa: Nia (Purpose). To make our collective vocation the development of our community; to restore our people to their classic greatness.

  4. December 29th.
4th day of kwanzaa: Ujamaa (Cooperative economics). To build our own businesses and control our communities’ economics, sharing in our work and wealth.

    December 29th.

    4th day of kwanzaa: Ujamaa (Cooperative economics). To build our own businesses and control our communities’ economics, sharing in our work and wealth.

  5. December 28th.
3rd day of Kwanzaa: Ujima (Collective responsibility). To maintain our community together; to make our siblings’ problems our own & solve them together.

    December 28th.

    3rd day of Kwanzaa: Ujima (Collective responsibility). To maintain our community together; to make our siblings’ problems our own & solve them together.

  6. December 27th.
2nd day of Kwanzaa: Kujichagulia (Self-determination). To define ourselves, name ourselves, create for ourselves, and speak for ourselves.

    December 27th.

    2nd day of Kwanzaa: Kujichagulia (Self-determination). To define ourselves, name ourselves, create for ourselves, and speak for ourselves.

  7. December 26th.
1st Day of Kwanzaa: Umoja (Unity). To strive for a principled & harmonious togetherness in the family, community, and world Afro-Community

    December 26th.

    1st Day of Kwanzaa: Umoja (Unity). To strive for a principled & harmonious togetherness in the family, community, and world Afro-Community

  8. Kwanzaa is a week-long holiday (Dec 26th-31st)  created in 1966 to unite people in study of African philosophies and traditions, and offer a cultural counterpart to the political goals of  the time.  Kwanzaa was the vision of Dr. Maulana Karenga (current chair of the Africana Studies Department at California State University, Long Beach), and he describes it as “an ancient and living cultural tradition which reflects the best of African thought and practice.” It was first celebrated among members of the burgeoning Black Power movement and initially contended that Christianity was a White religion that Blacks should shun, but has since evolved into a cultural holiday rather than a religious one. The name derives from the Swahili phrase, “first fruits of harvest,” highlighting the Pan-African focus on the East African language of Swahili (despite the fact that East Africa was not involved in the Atlantic Slave Trade).  Kwanzaa is based on Seven Principles (the Nguzo Saba): Umoja (unity); Kujichagulia (self-determination); Ujima (collective responsibility); Ujamaa (cooperative economics); Nia (purpose); Kuumba (creativity), and Imani (faith). According to Dr. Karenga, it “brings a cultural message which speaks to the best of what it means to be African and human in the fullest sense.”

    Kwanzaa is a week-long holiday (Dec 26th-31st)  created in 1966 to unite people in study of African philosophies and traditions, and offer a cultural counterpart to the political goals of  the time.  Kwanzaa was the vision of Dr. Maulana Karenga (current chair of the Africana Studies Department at California State University, Long Beach), and he describes it as “an ancient and living cultural tradition which reflects the best of African thought and practice.” It was first celebrated among members of the burgeoning Black Power movement and initially contended that Christianity was a White religion that Blacks should shun, but has since evolved into a cultural holiday rather than a religious one. The name derives from the Swahili phrase, “first fruits of harvest,” highlighting the Pan-African focus on the East African language of Swahili (despite the fact that East Africa was not involved in the Atlantic Slave Trade).  Kwanzaa is based on Seven Principles (the Nguzo Saba): Umoja (unity); Kujichagulia (self-determination); Ujima (collective responsibility); Ujamaa (cooperative economics); Nia (purpose); Kuumba (creativity), and Imani (faith). According to Dr. Karenga, it “brings a cultural message which speaks to the best of what it means to be African and human in the fullest sense.”


  9. Happy Kwanzaa! Kwanzaa celebrations draw friends and families together to reinforce their bonds, to reflect on their strengths, practice cultural traditions and to sustain progress for the coming year.  Use the seven principles of Kwanzaa to guide your questions and reflections:Umoja – UnityKujichagulia – Self-DeterminationUjima – Collective Work & ResponsibilityUjamaa – Cooperative EconomicsNia – PurposeKuumba – CreativityImani – Faith

    Happy Kwanzaa! Kwanzaa celebrations draw friends and families together to reinforce their bonds, to reflect on their strengths, practice cultural traditions and to sustain progress for the coming year.  Use the seven principles of Kwanzaa to guide your questions and reflections:

    Umoja – Unity
    Kujichagulia – Self-Determination
    Ujima – Collective Work & Responsibility
    Ujamaa – Cooperative Economics
    Nia – Purpose
    Kuumba – Creativity
    Imani – Faith